Define the term feudalism. What is feudalism? Definition of medieval feudalism 2019-01-13

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Urban Dictionary: Feudalism

define the term feudalism

The relationship between a lord and a vassal depended on mutual respect. Such an oath follows homage. That's where the analogy to a retail store works again. Little incentive existed for personal loyalty to sovereign rulers. A lord also had the right to reject the marriage of an heiress to a fief if he did not want the husband as his vassal.

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feudalism

define the term feudalism

After Charlemagne's death, his descendants warred over land ownership, and Europe fell apart into thousands of seigniories, or kingdoms run by a sovereign lord. If the lord abused the vassal, the vassal could break faith with the lord and offer his services to another lord, preferably one who could protect the vassal against the wrath of the defied lord. Further, the earliest use of feuum as a replacement for beneficium can be dated to 899, the same year a Muslim base at in was established. Feudalism should also be distinguished from the general brutality and oppression of medieval Europe. In the 20th century, the historian was very influential on the topic of feudalism.

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Feudalism Synonyms, Feudalism Antonyms

define the term feudalism

These are examples; depending on the period of time and location in Europe, feudal customs and practices varied; see. At its core, it was an agreement between a lord and a vassal. The origin of the feudum and why it replaced beneficium has not been well established, but there are multiple theories, described below. At its core, it was an agreement between a lord and a vassal. It created what might be called a decentralized government, where power was not exclusively focused on a single ruler or king but was dispersed. Immediately afterward, the lord raised the vassal to his feet and kissed him on the mouth to symbolize their social equality. Outside a European context, the concept of feudalism is normally used only by called semi-feudal , most often in discussions of Japan under the , and sometimes medieval and.

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feudalism definition

define the term feudalism

The remains of feudalism can be found in contemporary law regarding land. If the heir was a minor, the lord could sell or give away custody of the land and enjoy its profits until the heir came of age. Other vassals were given scutage, in which the vassal agreed to pay money in lieu of military service. The arrangement was not forced on the vassal; it was profitable for the vassal and made on mutual consent, and it fostered the allegiance necessary for royal control of distant lands. The word was derived by English scholars from foedum, the Latin form of fief. The popular understanding of feudalism often equates the bloody conquests of the medieval period 500—1500 with feudalism because feudalism was a predominant social framework for much of the period. Like feudalism, it was a growth, a development of existing forms.

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Use feudalism in a sentence

define the term feudalism

Concerning the king's feudal court, such deliberation could include the question of declaring war. If a lord acted in the service of a king, the lord was considered a vassal of the king. When you read about King Arthur or Roland, you are glimpsing some of those relationships as they were meant to be. As part of the feudal agreement, the lord promised to protect the vassal and provided the vassal with a plot of land. In fact, after the death of Cromwell, feudalism was extinct in England. The remains of feudalism can be found in contemporary law regarding land.

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Feudalism

define the term feudalism

In wartime, knight service also called for guard duty at the lord's castle for a specified period of time. They took leadership positions in their locality and also served as advisers for lords in feudal courts. The Lord's First Night: The Myth of the Droit de Cuissage. Manorialism was another system of land use practiced in medieval Europe. Others have taken the concept to its heart: the contract between a lord and his or her vassals, a reciprocal arrangement of support in exchange for service. In feudalism, a lord gave his most trusted men, known as vassals, land and power over all the people living there, and in return they swore loyalty to him and promised to give him a share of their taxes and provide military support whenever called upon.

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feudalism

define the term feudalism

In lieu of military service, some vassals were given socage, or tenure in exchange for the performance of a variety of duties. Later studies In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and , both historians of medieval Britain, arrived at different conclusions as to the character of English society before the in 1066. For example, when a vassal died, the lord was entitled to a large sum of money from the vassal's heirs. The vassal was also vested with the power to lease the land to others for profit, a practice known as subinfeudation. Other vassals were given scutage, in which the vassal agreed to pay money in lieu of military service. Once the commendation ceremony was complete, the lord and vassal were now in a feudal relationship with agreed-upon mutual obligations to one another. However, feudalism was a relatively civil arrangement in an especially vicious time and place in history.

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What is feudalism? Definition of medieval feudalism

define the term feudalism

Maryanne Cline Horowitz, Thomas Gale 2005,. He might, in turn, parcel out his own land and be a lord to a group of warriors even as he is a vassal to a more powerful lord. These acquired powers significantly reduced the presence of centralized power in these empires. The price of a vassal's power was allegiance to the lord, or fealty. The first attested instance of this is from 984, although more primitive forms were seen up to one-hundred years earlier. Round argued that the Normans had brought feudalism with them to England, while Maitland contended that its fundamentals were already in place in Britain before 1066. London; New York: Longmans, Green.

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