Resolution and independence. William Wordsworth: Resolution and Independence. 2019-01-17

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392. Resolution and Independence. William Wordsworth. 1909

resolution and independence

Through the power of the human mind, particularly memory, adults can recollect the devoted connection to nature of their youth. Along with the independence issue, it also proposed to establish a plan for ensuing American foreign relations, and to prepare a plan of a confederation for the states to consider. Their relationship to nature is passionate and extreme: children feel joy at seeing a rainbow but great terror at seeing desolation or decay. The final draft of the was prepared during the summer of 1777 and approved by Congress for ratification by the individual states on November 15, 1777, after a year of debate. A man walks through the countryside after a night of rain. And he had many hardships to endure: From pond to pond he roamed, from moor to moor: Housing, with God’s good help, by choice or chance; And in this way he gained an honest maintenance, The old Man still stood talking by my side; But now his voice to me was like a stream Scarce heard; nor word from word could I divide: And the whole body of the Man did seem Like one whom I had met with in a dream; Or like a man from some far region sent, To give me human strength, by apt admonishment. Active wandering allows the characters to experience and participate in the vastness and beauty of the natural world.

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Resolution and Independence by William Wordsworth

resolution and independence

—Perplexed, and longing to be comforted, My question eagerly did I renew, ‘How is it that you live, and what is it you do? I heard the sky-lark warbling in the sky; And I bethought me of the playful hare: Even such a happy Child of earth am I; Even as these blissful creatures do I fare; Far from the world I walk, and from all care; But there may come another day to me— Solitude, pain of heart, distress, and poverty. Then to the old man that was present in the surrounding. Whatever poem Wordsworth intended to write, in the one that he did write the leech gatherer emerges as an equivocal figure whose monotonous wandering and wizened aspect cloud what hope or corrective lesson he seems to indicate, placing him—to the benefit of the poem, let me add—in the same sinking spiritual boat as Wordsworth himself. He told me that he to this pond had come To gather Leeches, being old and poor: Employment hazardous and wearisome! Portrait of William Wordsworth The title of this poem reflects the resolution and independence of an old man encountered by the narrator as well as the subsequent resolution of the narrator himself. I thought of Chatterton, the marvellous Boy, The sleepless Soul that perished in his pride; Of Him who walked in glory and in joy Following his plough, along the mountain-side: By our own spirits are we deified: We Poets in our youth begin in gladness; But thereof come in the end despondency and madness.

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Wordsworth’s Poetical Works Essay

resolution and independence

A good relationship with nature helps individuals connect to both the spiritual and the social worlds. On September 24, Congress approved negotiating instructions for commissioners to obtain a treaty with France, based on the template provided in the plan of treaties; the next day, Benjamin Franklin, , and Thomas Jefferson were elected commissioners to the court of France. On August 27, the amended plan of treaties was referred back to the committee to develop instructions concerning the amendments, and Richard Henry Lee and were added to the committee. Meyerstein, Life of Chatterton 1930 504-05. But, as it sometimes chanceth, from the might Of joys in minds that can no further go, As high as we have mounted in delight In our dejection do we sink as low; To me that morning did it happen so; And fears and fancies thick upon me came; Dim sadness—and blind thoughts, I knew not, nor could name. And soon with this he other matter blended, Cheerfully uttered, with demeanour kind, But stately in the main; and when he ended, I could have laughed myself to scorn to find In that decrepit Man so firm a mind. That a plan of confederation be prepared and transmitted to the respective Colonies for their consideration and approbation.


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SparkNotes: Wordsworth’s Poetry: Themes, Motifs & Symbols

resolution and independence

The wandering nature of the Leech Gatherer corresponds to his fluctuating identity, both of which undo the stability that Wordsworth hopes to give, through him, to himself. This is a lonesome place for one like you. Now, whether it were by peculiar grace, A leading from above, a something given, Yet it befell, that, in this lonely place, When I with these untoward thoughts had striven, Beside a pool bare to the eye of heaven I saw a man before me unawares: The oldest man he seemed that ever wore grey hairs. Still, even the interior paradise of imagination requires the support and encouragement of Nature, and the Leech Gatherer, representing Nature in a peculiarly Romantic way, stands or floats both inside and outside the poet everywhere, that is, and nowhere , half-created, half-real. The following day, another committee of five , Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, , and was established to prepare a plan of treaties to be proposed to foreign powers; a third committee was created, consisting of one member from each colony, to prepare a draft of a constitution for confederation of the states. It continued in use from that time onward, although it was not ratified by all states until four years later on March 1, 1781.

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Resolution And Independence Poem by William Wordsworth

resolution and independence

Yet the illustrations of this poem are as lively as the main design is far removed from bodily attributes. His words came feebly, from a feeble chest, But each in solemn order followed each, With something of a lofty utterance drest-- Choice word, and measured phrase, above the reach Of ordinary men; a stately speech; Such as grave Livers do in Scotland use, Religious men, who give to God and man their dues. My former thoughts returned: the fear that kills; And hope that is unwilling to be fed; Cold, pain, and labour, and all fleshly ills; And mighty Poets in their misery dead. A good example of this can be found on lines 11 through 14. Himself he propp'd, his body, limbs, and face, Upon a long grey Staff of shaven wood: And, still as I drew near with gentle pace, Beside the little pond or moorish flood Motionless as a Cloud the Old Man stood; That heareth not the loud winds when they call; And moveth altogether, if it move at all.

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WORDSWORTH’S WANDERING IN “RESOLUTION AND INDEPENDENCE”

resolution and independence

Cambridge, Massachusetts: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1963. Facsimile: Oxford University Press, 1914, 1952. Himself he propped, his body, limbs, and face, Upon a long grey Staff of shaven wood: And, still as I drew near with gentle pace, Beside the little pond or moorish flood Motionless as a Cloud the Old Man stood; That heareth not the loud winds when they call; And moveth altogether, if it move at all. This is a lonesome place for one like you. Long debates followed on such issues as sovereignty, the exact powers to be given the confederate government, whether to have a judiciary, and voting procedures.

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Resolution And Independence Poem by William Wordsworth

resolution and independence

V I heard the sky-lark warbling in the sky; And I bethought me of the playful hare: Even such a happy Child of earth am I; Even as these blissful creatures do I fare; Far from the world I walk, and from all care; But there may come another day to me-- Solitude, pain of heart, distress, and poverty. Life may be hard but it still goes on and one day you could wake up and everything be okay. As the speaker chats with the old man, he realizes the similarities between leech gathering and writing poetry. At length, himself unsettling, he the pond Stirred with his staff, and fixedly did look Upon the muddy water, which he conned, As if he had been reading in a book: And now a stranger’s privilege I took; And, drawing to his side, to him did say, ‘This morning gives us promise of a glorious day. He greets the man and asks what he is doing. Through his meeting with the Leech-gatherer, he learns that through perseverance he can too be successful.

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Wordsworth’s Poetical Works Essay

resolution and independence

Himself he propped, limbs, body, and pale face, Upon a long grey staff of shaven wood: And, still as I drew near with gentle pace, Upon the margin of that moorish flood Motionless as a cloud the old Man stood, That heareth not the loud winds when they call And moveth all together, if it move at all. He told me that he to this pond had come To gather Leeches, being old and poor: Employment hazardous and wearisome! While I these thoughts within myself pursued, He, having made a pause, the same discourse renewed. University Press of New England, 1999. Himself he propped, limbs, body, and pale face, Upon a long grey staff of shaven wood: And, still as I drew near with gentle pace, Upon the margin of that moorish flood Motionless as a cloud the old Man stood; That heareth not the loud winds when they call; And moveth altogether, if it move at all. His words came feebly, from a feeble chest, Yet each in solemn order followed each, With something of a lofty utterance drest; Choice word, and measured phrase; above the reach Of ordinary men; a stately speech; Such as grave Livers do in Scotland use, Religious men, who give to God and Man their dues. The one-and-a-half-year passage of time and the recollective act itself have given the poet perspective, and he fluidly moves in and out of the vision, a wanderer back and forth between two worlds.


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Wordsworth, William. 1888. Complete Poetical Works.

resolution and independence

I thought of Chatterton, the marvellous Boy, The sleepless Soul that perished in his pride; Of Him who walked in glory and in joy Behind his plough, upon the mountain-side: By our own spirits are we deified; We Poets in our youth begin in gladness; But thereof comes in the end despondency and madness. In line 12, Wordsworth provides the reader the sensory image of sound or feeling, depending upon the listener. The man seems weighed down with care; he is so still he seems dead. The text of the document formally announcing this action was the , approved two days later on July 4, 1776, which is celebrated as. It was an easy read but you definitely would have to reread it to make sure you did not miss any small details. Vision and Sight Throughout his poems, Wordsworth fixates on vision and sight as the vehicles through which individuals are transformed.

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