Runaway slaves rebels on the plantation. Review of John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger, Runaway Slaves: Rebels on the Plantation 2019-02-23

Runaway slaves rebels on the plantation Rating: 5,5/10 971 reviews

Runaway Slaves: Rebels on the Plantation

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

For generations, important aspects about slave life on the plantations of the American South have remained shrouded. There is little doubt, however, that such expressions of displeasure were widespread. The overwhelming evidence presented in this richly detailed study should dispel, once and for all, the notion that runaway slaves were mere aberrations and that the slave South was a tranquil society inhabited by benevolent white masters and happy, loyal, good-natured blacks contented with their lots as slaves. What becomes extremely clear is the profits involved in the trafficking of human beings was apparently worth all the trouble that plantation owners went through. What this detailing makes clear is the slaves' understanding that anything preventing them from acquiring material and intellectual resources was the basis of their continued enslavement. You will also have a great resource for any other reading you may want to do in the area of slavery and resistance to bondage.


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Runaway slaves : rebels on the plantation : Franklin, John Hope, 1915

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

The E-mail message field is required. Some attempted to return to loved ones or to return to the areas they were raised. Last seen heading towards the Eastern shore. But careful use of this evidence and other sources reveals the depth of hostility many slaves felt toward their owners and overseers. Runaways faced tremendous obstacles, the authors point out: they had to travel hundreds of miles to freedom amid a well-organized system of slave catching and retrieval that was so efficient and vicious that it even enslaved free blacks, and runaways faced drastic penalties, including physical punishment and even death, if caught. Their analysis of these documents addresses a gap in contemporary scholarship on slavery, which has focused on slave narratives, diaries of slave planters, and plantation records.

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Runaway slaves : rebels on the plantation : Franklin, John Hope, 1915

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

The book begins by describing the acts of defiance which slaves took against their captors. They reacted to being traded or sold or to having family members traded or sold. Moreover, they lived under constant threats of physical and mental violence and were conditioned to respond in kind. By surveying a wealth of documents, such as planters' records, petitions to county courts and state legislatures, and local newspapers, this book shows how slaves resisted, when, where, and how they escaped, where they fled to, how long they remained in hiding, and how they survived away from the plantation. Failure to do so will probably result in a disappointing experience. Some chopped cotton so nonchalantly that they cut the young plants nearly into fodder, while others harvested rice or sugar with such indifference that they damaged the crop.

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Review of John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger, Runaway Slaves: Rebels on the Plantation

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

Turner, who was the slave of Joseph Travis, was a preacher who saw visions and felt divinely inspired to lead his people to freedom. For as Franklin and Schweninger make clear, slave families often did not know where their loved ones had fled. . The endless toil of clearing land, planting grains, cotton, and sugar, coupled with the unhealthy climate and the stifling heat during the summer months, made life at best a continuous, grinding routine of work. After all, overseers were white but had done little with their position of advantage and were as subject to the owners' whims as were the slaves themselves. Runaway Slaves compellingly documents the perseverance of thousands of African Americans who fought to be free. Dissidents in the Conscript Army Day to Day Resistance Hired Slave Dissatisfaction Open Defiance Slaves and Overseers Conspiracies The Pride of Dissidence 2.

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RUNAWAY SLAVES by John Hope Franklin , Loren Schweninger

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

Like Jake, other slaves were frustrated, alienated, defiant, sometimes violent; indeed, Jake's anger and hostility represented a far greater proportion of the slave population than might be suspected. Nor were slaveholders in the region as likely as in the rice planting sections of South Carolina and Georgia to implement the task system. This book showed how commonly black people employed tactics like running away, sabotage, laying out, theft, violence, and more to subvert their exploitation. The overseer got off his horse and, holding the reins with his left hand, struck her thirty or forty stripes across the shoulders. This book showed how commonly black people employed tactics like running away I learned very little about black people's resistance to slavery in school - it was mostly limited to the high profile stories of people like Nat Turner, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Dred Scott, and Harriet Tubman.

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Runaway slaves : rebels on the plantation : Franklin, John Hope, 1915

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

He plotted his revolt for six months, sharing his plan with only four others. In rural areas, planters and farmers hired extra hands for harvesting the crops and sent their skilled artisans to work for neighbors who needed carpenters, coopers, or mechanics. The one of the reasons was avoiding traffic barriers. However, severe punishment did not detour thousands of slaves from making escape attempts. Of course, the data is incomplete; many runaways simply disappeared into history, and their motives and stories will never be told.

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Runaway slaves : rebels on the plantation : Franklin, John Hope, 1915

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

You might have to stop at more than one place. Furthermore, slaves ran away in great numbers, and when they ran they did not necessarily go North. From John Hope Franklin, America's foremost African American historian, comes this groundbreaking analysis of slave resistance and escape. Although, Further along in the chapter, it. Slaves resented being chided, scolded, chastised, punished, and whipped; they disliked being supervised during their work day by young, inexperienced white men who moved to the next plantation within a few months or years; they bitterly resented threats against their families if certain work was not completed satisfactorily within a certain period of time. The results of running away or committing crimes was often extremely steep.

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Runaway Slaves: Rebels on the Plantation (English Edition) eBook: John Hope Franklin, Loren Schweninger: mapoolcampus.com: Tienda Kindle

runaway slaves rebels on the plantation

As a hireling, she cleaned, washed, made beds, folded linens, swept, and cooked. Often relatives or friends would house, feed, or supply fugitives for at least a short time, despite personal risk. Description: 1 online resource 476 pages Contents: Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. But each of these spawned other conspiracies, and there were a number of instances where slaves secretly planned, or at least discussed, violent retribution against their owners and other whites. Jake quickly drew a knife.

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